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ART



VOLTA PHOTO
Starring Sanle Sory and the People of Bobo-Dioulasso in the Small but
Musically Mighty Country of Burkina Faso
 Art Institute of Chicago
111 S. Michigan Ave.
312-443-3600
Now through Aug 19th
Daily from 10:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Admission: $14 for Illinois residents
www.artic.edu

Designed to resemble a cross between a photography studio and a record store, this multisensory exhibition brings together commercial studio photography and popular music from the former West African country of Upper Volta. Through this dynamic conjunction of image and sound, Volta Photo examines the postcolonial culture of an economically challenged but recently liberated country negotiating its local, regional, and international identities.

In 1960, photographer Sanle Sory (born 1943) opened his studio, Volta Photo, at the center of Bobo-Dioulasso, the cultural capital of what was then Upper Volta. He specialized in portraits -- of Fula villagers, elaborately dressed Malians, and other inhabitants of that vibrant cultural crossroads.





INTIMATE ENCOUNTERS
A group exhibition
Blanc Gallery
4445 South King
773-373-4320
Now until Aug 24th
(Call for viewing times)
www.blancchicago.com

Intimate Encounters is a group exhibition of photography, video, painting and sculpture that affectionately probes  domestic space and in turn domestic life of African-American and Latino communities, with an emphasis on the position and prowess of women, mothers and immigrant families. Exhibiting artists include Jarvis Boyland, William Camargo, Emilio Rojas, Darryl DeAngelo Terrell and Titus Wonsey. The exhibition is curated by Felicia Mings with exhibition design and graphic design by Ashley King.

Founded in 2010, ACRE is a non-profit organization based in Chicago designed to support emerging artists develop, discuss and present their artistic practices. Artists Jarvis Boyland, William Camargo, Emilio Rojas and Darryl DeAngelo Terrell participated in ACRE's 2017 summer residency. To learn more about ACRE visit: www.arcreresidency.org




CHARLES WHITE: A RETROSPECTIVE
Art Institute of Chicago
111 S. Michigan Ave.
312-443-3600
Not through Sept 3rd
Daily from 10:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Admission: $14 for Illinois residents
www.artic.edu



Charles White (1918-1979) powerfully interpreted African American history, culture, and lives over the course of his four-decade career.  A superbly gifted draftsman and printmaker as well as a talented mural and easel painter, he developed a distinctive and labor-intensive approach to art making and remained committed to a representational style at a time when the art world increasingly favored abstraction. His work magnified the power of the black figure through scale and form, communicating universal human themes while also focusing attention on the lives of African Americans and the struggle for equality. This exhibition -- the first major retrospective of White's work in more than 35 years -- showcases an accomplished artist whose work continues to resonate amid today's national dialogues about race, work, equality and history.




NEVER A LOVELY SO REAL
Photography and Film in Chicago, 1950-1980
Art Institute of Chicago
111 S. Michigan Ave.
312-443-3600
Now through Oct 28th
Daily 10:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Admission: $14 for Illinois residents
www.artic.edu

These artists focused on Chicago's history as a city of neighborhoods, many of them fiercely segregated and separated from one another. Together, they constructed a portrait of Chicago in the second half of the 20th century as cultural, social, and political events transformed the city.

Drawn largely from the Art Institute's collection, this exhibition highlights the work of artists who through their images and films captured the life of their own communities or those to which they were granted intimate access as outsiders. Featured among them is a network of photographers who focused on Chicago's South Side during a period coinciding with the emergence of the city's Black Arts Movement. Billy Abernathy, Darryl Cowherd, Bob Crawford, Roy Lewis, and Robert A. Sengstacke all produced work in connection with the revolutionary Bronzeville mural, the Wall of Respect (1967-71).